Friday, August 23, 2013

evansknight:

I think this is one of my favorite versions of this song I’ve heard. Lela Tsurtsumia’s Georgian and Lazuri stuff is lowkey awesome, and so when this started playing and I heard Karadenizli Turkish I was like “Whaaaaaaaaaat?" From what I understand, these words are the most common ones used for Turkish versions of this song, and are adapted from original Lazuri lyrics, but since more people on the Black Sea coast speak Turkish than speak Lazuri, it seems to have migrated.

Yaylanun çimenine (oh nenni koçari)
Keçi vurur canini (haydi haydi koçari)
Oy bir sarayim seni (oh nenni koçari)
Geçsun yürek yangini (haydi haydi koçari)

Oh nenni koçari, koçari kimun yari
Oh nenni koçari, koçari benum yarum

Yaylalar sıra sıra (oh nenni koçari)
Vuruldum selvi boya (haydi haydi koçari)
Koçari gel burdan geç (oh nenni koçari)
Göreyim doya doya (haydi haydi koçari)

Oh nenni koçari, koçari kimun yari
Oh nenni koçari, koçari benum yarum

Çayir çimen biçemem (oh nenni koçari)
Soğuk sular içemem (haydi haydi koçari)
İki cihan bir olsa (oh nenni koçari)
Koçari’den geçemem (haydi haydi koçari)

Oh nenni koçari, koçari kimun yari
Oh nenni koçari, koçari benum yarum

One of my favorite things about Karazenizli Turkish, as opposed to standard Istanbullu Turkish is that the Black Sea dialect almost ignores vowel harmony, which is a massively important feature of standard Turkish, and as a result ends up sounding a lot more like Osmanlıca, or Ottoman Turkish, as it was written in the Arabic script and spoken before the standardizing measures of Atatürk. 

It should also be noted that one of my favorite things in music is when a song starts by repeating the same sequence over and over again, and each time a new instrument joins in. So she hooked me with that, then slayed me with the song.

Ugh, Evans you’re a goddamn genius. Beautiful. Both the song and your description.

Friday, August 9, 2013

Oh my god, but this videooo… I love Rinat Karimov, the Dagestani (Dargin) pop singer, but somehow I never saw this handiwork before. Like, I started this tumblr post before I even finished watching the video. I literally have no clue what’s going on, but there are IRA soldiers, cowboys and Indians, Russian gangsters, and the actual comedians from Dagestan’s show Горцы от ума - so many cultural references all together that my head is exploding, and all that set to a song I’m going to be listening to a lot.

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Heartbreak, every time we meet, it feels like you’re something totally new. 

atenebris:

flying UAZ

HAHAHA

atenebris:

flying UAZ

HAHAHA

Dagestani pop, yo. Awesome song “Mubarak” (means ‘congratulations’ or ‘blessed’ in Arabic) sung by husband and wife duo Patimat Kagirova and Rinat Karimov, sung in Dargin.

Memories warm you up from the inside. But they also tear you apart. Haruki Murakami (via observando)
Monday, June 24, 2013

Behold, a Chechen wedding party. 

At 11:20 a girl in a white shirt and black skirt starts dancing. Flash a couple times to people checking her out like “hmm, okay…” - this is normal. If you watch the rest of the video (which I don’t recommend - it’s repetitive and the dancers aren’t remarkable per se) you’ll know what I mean. But then, at 12:09, the music changes, and she starts totally rocking the moves like she really feels it - confident, smiling, and just enjoying herself. The whole atmosphere changes. The video flashes to more faces, but this time, they’re smiling from ear to ear. At some point the girl moves over to the “wall of men” - the side of the dance floor occupied by males who clap, whistle, and yell on the dancing males when they end up nearby. These men usually ignore the dancing girl, but here, she is at the center of their attention. #purejoy

#Caucasus #dance #Chechnya 

 

Sunday, April 21, 2013 Friday, February 15, 2013